Is Massage Therapy the Missing Link in Pain Management?

As unpleasant as it is, pain is good because it protects us. The human brain has neurons or nerve cells, which “carry messages” that tell us if something is painful or pleasurable. If you couldn’t feel the sensation of being burned, this could be deadly so pain is actually a lifesaver.

Is it Worth Taking Opioids for Pain Relief?

As human beings, it is difficult to be patient when we have acute or chronic pain. It is a sensation we desperately try to avoid, and if it hits we do what we can to limit the experience. Julius Caesar said, “[i]t is easier to find men who will volunteer to die, than to find those who are willing to endure pain with patience.”

What’s President Trump On? Let’s take a peek inside his medicine cabinet, and explore the potential side effects of the medications he takes.

Donald Trump’s longtime New York physician, Dr. Harold N. Bornstein, is no stranger to the public spotlight. In 2015, he penned a letter declaring the then-candidate would be the “healthiest individual ever elected” president. Now, with Trump in office, Dr. Bornstein is sharing details about the president’s use of medications.

When easing the pain turns fatal: Fentanyl took Prince from us and continues to gain popularity

In April 2016, the world learned about the untimely death of a legend known as Prince. He died of an accidental fentanyl overdose, the autopsy showed. However, the pills found at his Paisley Park home were mislabeled, according to reports, highlighting an ongoing issue: opioid deaths. Despite efforts to rein in opioid-related deaths in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that death rates continue to rise.

When easing the pain turns fatal: The big problem with opioids and anti-anxiety drugs

You may or may not have heard that opioid painkiller use has skyrocketed into epidemic proportions, with deadly overdoses on the rise. For example, The Washington Post reported that between 1999 and 2014, deadly opioid overdoses among middle-aged white women shot up 400 percent. But it’s not just opioid use we have to worry about. In fact, anti-anxiety drugs called benzodiazepines contributed to many of those deaths, even as much as a third of them in recent years.

A natural pain reliever after a tooth extraction

Often, dentists send their patients home with pain medicine after a procedure. You may have been given ibuprofen for pain and inflammation. But what you may not know is that ibuprofen carries risks, including ulcers, gastritis, kidney problems and high blood pressure. Most of these side effects won’t occur with just one dose, but you may consume enough ibuprofen over the course of your entire recovery to be cause for concern.

Be proactive when mixing prescription drugs

More than likely, either you or someone close to you is taking a prescription drug. Sometimes, people take multiple medications to manage coexisting health problems, like diabetes and hypertension. This is called polypharmacy. But while keeping your medical conditions under control is important, polypharmacy can become a problem when too many medications are prescribed by multiple specialists working independently of each other, or when drug interactions occur because no single doctor knows your complete medication picture.

Over-prescribing opioids: Where does this problem stem from?

We’ve recently reported on the tremendous overuse of prescription painkiller drugs in this country. Almost everyone knows someone on Vicodin, Percocet, or Norco. Some patients have trouble getting off the drugs, and part of the problem is over-prescribing. So, where is this over-prescribing coming from?

Opioid overdoses on the rise

The U.S. is experiencing an epidemic in drug overdose deaths, the CDC says, and misuse of opioid painkillers are a big part of the problem. Since 2000, overdose deaths from opioids have risen 200 percent. In 2014, there were approximately one and a half times more drug overdose deaths than deaths from car crashes in the U.S.

Why your doctor said no to the antibiotic

You’ve got a cold and some body aches. You believe you may need an antibiotic, but your doctor doesn’t want to write the prescription. When doctors say not to take an antibiotic, they aren’t necessarily “denying” their patients. Rather, it’s a sign that they did a good physical exam and medical history, and determined that a virus is the cause of illness. Generally, the term “antibiotic “refers to medicine that is designed to kill bacteria.

Taking Synthroid? Be proactive for your thyroid!

Many patients with hypothyroidism are given a prescription drug called levothyroxine sodium (one of the branded versions is called Synthroid), a synthetic hormone replacement for the hormone normally produced by your thyroid (T4) to regulate the body’s energy and metabolism. According to research firm IMS, Synthroid is the most prescribed drug in America, at 21.6 million prescriptions between April 2014 through March 2015.

Be proactive: Know which nutrients are depleted by your prescription drug

Nutrients – you can’t function without them! Critical nutrients – such as vitamins, minerals, proteins, fats, carbs and water – are essential for metabolism, energy and repair. They are the fuel that keeps your body functioning. As these nutrients are used up by the body’s metabolic activities, they need to be replaced – or you may end up with problems. But did you know that common medications may deplete the body of vital nutrients? It is very important that you be proactive and make sure you understand which nutrients are being depleted by the medications you take.

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