Prediabetic? Try exercise to control your blood sugar levels

Staying fit into middle age may be one way to reduce your risk of prediabetes and diabetes, according to a new study published in Diabetologia online. Prediabetes simply means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but is not yet diabetes. It is estimated that half of all U.S. adults have either prediabetes or diabetes.

How diabetes and foot drop are related

If you have diabetes, or someone you love has diabetes, you are certainly not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. That’s 9.3 percent of the population. Among senior citizens, age 65 and up, the prevalence was even higher, at 25.9 percent. As you may already know, diabetes can cause problems with your feet, including “foot drop.” Foot drop refers to the inability to lift the front part of the foot. People who have this condition may be noted to lift their knees higher than normal to avoid dragging their toes.

Two birds, one stone: Fight obesity and diabetes together

Type 2 diabetes has been on the rise in the U.S. Of the people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, about 80 to 90 percent are also diagnosed as obese. This provides an interesting clue to the link between diabetes and obesity. So, how exactly can obesity cause Type 2 diabetes? Read on to find out.

Diabetes and Water Retention: How Are They Related?

If you have diabetes, or if someone close to you does, perhaps you've noticed some swelling in the ankles where fluid has built up, causing a puffy appearance. This is typically water retention, also called edema, and is relatively common among diabetics. Let’s take a look at how diabetes and water retention are related.

Chromium: A promising mineral for diabetes treatment

Chromium is a mineral that your body requires in small amounts. It can be found in certain foods as well as IN many supplements. Studies suggest that it is involved in normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. But that’s not all. There is a growing interest in the possible beneficial role of chromium in the treatment of diabetes.

Diabetes and low magnesium go hand in hand

Diabetes and low magnesium levels: Two common health problems affecting millions of people. But did you know that they are related? Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, according to the CDC. And most people, in general, aren’t getting enough magnesium on a daily basis. It turns out, low magnesium may make you worse off for developing diabetes, and having diabetes may in turn deplete your existing magnesium levels. Magnesium depletion affects at least 30 percent of diabetics. It’s a cycle that needs to be broken, and it starts with education. Let’s take a look at the relationship between this mineral and diabetes.

What is metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome or dysmetabolic syndrome, is a “cluster of conditions” that increase your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes (Mayo Clinic). Having just one of the conditions does not mean you have metabolic syndrome; typically, it is defined as having three or more of the five common traits: large waist circumference, high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol and elevated fasting blood sugar.

Diabetes: What’s your ‘type’?

Diabetes is described as a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use glucose (a type of sugar) used by the body for energy. To use glucose, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insulin stimulates the removal of glucose from the blood and its uptake into muscle, liver and fat cells where it can be stored for energy. In other words, insulin is important for regulating blood glucose levels.

Green bananas: a diabetes-friendly snack

Bananas are one of the most popular fruits around. In fact, they seem to be America’s favorite fruit, according to the USDA. The average American eats 27 pounds of bananas a year, and it’s no wonder! They're high in potassium, dietary fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins B6 and C. But what you may not know about bananas is that you don't have to wait for them to turn yellow to enjoy them.

Simple tips for managing diabetes at work

If you have diabetes, you know it can seem like you have two jobs — your regular one, and all your duties managing medications and blood sugars, not to mention doctor’s appointments. But your paid work might be causing you to take two steps forward and one step back in your diabetes care. Think about it. How often have the following scenarios applied to you?

The diabetes-stress link

Most people are aware of the usual risk factors for developing Type 2 diabetes, such as being overweight, not getting enough exercise, poor diet and smoking. But did you also know that stress is another risk factor for developing this disease that, according to the World Health Organization, impacts over 200 million people worldwide?

Get crackin’ -- Prevent diabetes before it strikes

A recent study reported this month that regular consumption of pistachios is beneficial for patients with prediabetes. According to the study, “pistachios appear to hold special properties. They contain more lutein, β-carotene and γ-tocopherol than other nuts, and they also appear to hold particular anti-inflammatory properties.”

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