Let’s take our heads out of the sand: What we are doing today may be increasing our risk for cancer

When it comes to cancer, what you don’t know can hurt you. And according to a recent survey from the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), it seems there’s a lot more many of us need to know -- like which lifestyle choices contribute to cancer and what we can do to reduce that risk.

Newsflash: Your pap smear doesn’t check for ovarian cancer! Here’s what to do to be proactive

September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. In the U.S. this year, an estimated 22,280 women will receive an ovarian cancer diagnosis, and 14,240 women will die of it, according to the American Cancer Society. It is the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women.

Simplify the hard task of picking the right cancer treatment: Let your genes decide

After a diagnosis of cancer comes the discussion of treatment options. The patient contemplates trying chemotherapy or radiation therapy, but wonders whether these treatment options will work. After all, they do come with a lot of collateral damage. For some people, the treatment causes more trouble than if the growth was just left untreated. Meanwhile, others respond quite well to the treatment. So, how is a patient to know which category he or she will fall into?

An alcohol-cancer link more people should know about

A drink after work, drinks with friends, drinks at yet another wedding -- it’s safe to say that there’s always an occasion to lift your glass. You know all about drinking responsibly, and you’d never dream of getting behind the wheel when you’re buzzed. But have you ever thought about the long-term consequences those drinks may have on your health?

Be proactive with screenings for colorectal cancer

If you are middle aged, there’s a good chance your doctor has mentioned the C word to you -- colonoscopy. Why? Because of that other C word -- cancer. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, according to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). In 2016, an estimated 134,000 people will be diagnosed with the disease, and about 49,000 will die from it.

Can cancer be prevented with exercise?

Good news if you just signed up for a summer obstacle race! A new study suggests exercise may reduce your risk of getting multiple kinds of cancer. In this study, researchers analyzed data from more than a million Americans and Europeans and found that exercise reduced the risk of 13 cancers out of the 26 they studied. The risk was reduced by anywhere from 10 to 42 percent.

Vitamin D may help with cancer prevention

You may have heard about the health benefits of vitamin D before – for migraines, uterine fibroids, memory, hives, bone strength, mood and your immune system. But did you know research shows it may help prevent cancer as well? Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine found that higher levels of vitamin D are associated with a reduced risk of cancer, ScienceDaily reports. The findings were recently published in PLOS ONE.

What is oxidative stress?

Oxidative stress – it’s one of those words that gets tossed around without much explanation. Who really knows what it means? Well, fear not, today is the day that all changes for you. Take a few minutes to understand what oxidative stress is and how it affects your long-term health. With this information, you can take proactive steps to help you enjoy life to the fullest.

Breast cancer screening recommendations for the proactive woman

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in American women. Everyone knows that screening is important, but when to start, and how often? Doctors and experts don’t always agree on this, and the answer is different for different women. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) put out their own respective guidelines, though they do differ.

Get the facts on bile duct cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, 2,000 to 3,000 people in the U.S. develop bile duct cancer per year and the incidence has been rising steadily during the last twenty years in the United States, Europe, Australia, Japan and Asia. It has been reported that this cancer affects mostly the older population -- the average age being 70. However, we have become increasingly aware of its effect on much younger individuals, including Daisy Llewelyn and, more recently, Japanese actress Naomi Kawashima. It is therefore critical that we learn about this cancer so we can be proactive.

Eating foods rich in phytoestrogens may reduce breast cancer risk

The hormone estrogen plays an important role in a woman’s health throughout her life. It is necessary for the development and growth of breasts, ovaries and the uterus; regulates the menstrual cycle; and is essential for reproduction. Estrogen also plays an important role in having a healthy heart and bones. The downside to all these benefits, however, is that a woman’s risk for breast cancer is associated with how much exposure she has to estrogen over the course of her life.

Go pink! Breast cancer gene test may save lives

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in women in the United States. It will affect one in eight women in their lifetime. About 5-10 percent of breast cancers are hereditary. But the good news is that tests can determine whether a woman has inherited the mutated genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which cause breast cancer.

Share Your Story And Help Others Live Healthier Lives

Add My Story

Newsletter

We recommend Science-Based Products from Metagenics