Carrie Fisher’s death a wake up call to help more women be proactive about heart attacks

Carrie Fisher, star of the beloved Star Wars franchise, died days after suffering a heart attack on a plane at age 60. Fans around the world were shocked, but should we really be so surprised? Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women in the United States. In fact, heart attacks kill six times as many women as breast cancer! One in three women die of heart disease; that’s approximately one every minute, according to the American Heart Association.

Lower incomes tied to high blood pressure rates: Why nutrition and education may be key

High blood pressure is a global health issue, affecting over a billion people, and it’s only gotten worse. The number of people with high blood pressure has nearly doubled over the last 40 years. But believe it or not, the United States, Canada and South Korea actually have the lowest rates in the world, according to a new study published in The Lancet, which examined worldwide blood pressure trends from 1975-2015.

Caddy Max Zechmann dies at age 55 from sudden heart attack: Is golf actually a dangerous sport?

A popular golf caddy Max Zechmann recently fell ill on the 13th hole while caddying for a French golf player in Dubai. He was 55 and suffered a heart attack, dying only a few hours later in the hospital. There have been a few other caddy deaths during professional golf tournaments in recent years: Ian MacGregor, age 52, in 2014 and Scott Steele, age 55, in 2012. Each experienced heart attacks.

Does raising your HDL “good cholesterol” really protect against heart disease?

In March, scientists discovered a gene mutation that raises HDL cholesterol levels (commonly known as the “good” cholesterol) -- but rather than protecting against heart disease, it increases your risk for it. With HDL cholesterol widely being touted as heart-protective, it made scientists scratch their heads, wondering if HDL cholesterol levels are not really a catch-all. Perhaps it’s not the amount of HDL that matters, but how it works and how well it removes unhealthy cholesterol.

Why fish eaters may be less likely to suffer a heart attack

Being proactive today may save you tomorrow -- especially when it comes to protecting your heart! Did you know 1.5 million heart attacks occur in the U.S. each year, with half a million deaths? With heart disease being the leading cause of death in the U.S., heart attacks are unfortunately all too common. One way you can reduce your risk? Eat more fish, a recent study says.

Iyengar yoga: Safe enough for pulmonary hypertension patients to reap big benefits

People turn to yoga for relief from all sorts of ailments – aches and pains, insomnia, headaches, stress and many more. Now, recent research is adding another condition to the list: pulmonary arterial hypertension. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is the medical term for high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs and right heart.

What is a coronary calcium scan?

Calcium isn’t always a good thing. You want it in your bones, but not so much in the form of kidney stones or in your heart. After all, calcium buildup in your heart is a risk factor for heart disease. But now, there’s a new way to find out if that’s happening.

What exactly is the “afterburn” and are you getting any?

Nowadays, many fitness programs are being marketed with the latest and greatest buzzword, “afterburn.” They say that you too can experience this post-workout phenomenon if you exercise a certain way. And it sounds great, doesn’t it? Who wouldn’t want to burn extra calories long past your sweat session? So let’s take a look at what exactly this afterburn effect is and how you can get it.

Your Summer Heart Check-Up: Catch early warning signs before they become serious problems

Summer is a good time to think about heart health. Fresh produce is abundant, providing a bounty of antioxidants. And you can enjoy more time outdoors, soaking up some vitamin D from the sun. Perhaps you're more active, taking advantage of the weather and going for a nice bike ride. Or you just got back from a family vacation, where you finally got that much needed rest and relaxation.

Be proactive about stents!

There are many people, mostly over the age of 50, walking around with foreign objects in their chests. These objects are called stents, and they have been reported to be lifesavers to innumerable people with coronary artery disease. In the past, even people who didn't have a heart attack, but who did have partial heart blockages (i.e. coronary artery disease), would get stents. But recent medical literature questions whether everyone with heart disease needs a stent.

Be proactive and reduce your risk for congestive heart failure

It’s estimated that there are 5.8 million people in the U.S. who have congestive heart failure, with approximately 1 million hospitalizations as a result each year. Most of the hospitalizations for congestive heart failure tend to be for patients who are 65 or older, but the rate of congestive heart failure hospitalizations for males under 65 has been increasing over the years. With millions of people in the U.S. being affected by this condition, there’s a chance you may be at risk. But you've taken the first proactive step by educating yourself about congestive heart failure.

Avoid Overtreatment and Get an Accurate Blood Pressure Reading!

“Woah! I knew I was a little nervous, but I was not expecting my blood pressure to have increased by that much!” Well, it’s possible it didn’t. You may experience a “white coat effect,” where you get a high reading in the doctor’s office, but outside the office, your blood pressure is totally normal. And sometimes a high blood pressure reading is caused by something as small as the way you are sitting, such as when you cross your legs or need to use the restroom. Believe it or not, all these activities can give you a falsely high reading.

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