Eating foods rich in phytoestrogens may reduce breast cancer risk

The hormone estrogen plays an important role in a woman’s health throughout her life. It is necessary for the development and growth of breasts, ovaries and the uterus; regulates the menstrual cycle; and is essential for reproduction. Estrogen also plays an important role in having a healthy heart and bones. The downside to all these benefits, however, is that a woman’s risk for breast cancer is associated with how much exposure she has to estrogen over the course of her life.

Can’t we all just detox?

Boxes containing body “cleanses” adorn the shelves at every health food store. They contain everything from fiber to green tea to milk thistle. They promise to make you feel like a new person by coaxing all the toxins out of your body into your bowel movement or urine.

Antibiotics: The more you use them, the more you abuse them

Antibiotics are generally understood by the average person as the drugs used to cure infections. And most people fully expect their doctors to prescribe antibiotics for a bad cough, cold, sore throat, flu or ear infection. But in a study conducted by Utah University researchers, it was found that “in more than 25 percent of cases, such prescriptions are useless because the infection stems from a virus, which cannot be treated with antibiotics.” Treating a viral infection with antibiotics means that you’re taking medicine that may have no chance of helping you, and a very real chance of hurting you. So why would doctors prescribe an antibiotic that does not help?

Go pink! Breast cancer gene test may save lives

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in women in the United States. It will affect one in eight women in their lifetime. About 5-10 percent of breast cancers are hereditary. But the good news is that tests can determine whether a woman has inherited the mutated genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which cause breast cancer.

Thinking about a juice cleanse? Read this first

Juice bars are popping up on every corner, especially here in Southern California. For many people, it has become perfectly normal to drink seven dollars' worth kale and ginger for breakfast. These days, it seems everyone is trying a juice cleanse.

Be proactive: Reduce your risk for breast cancer

Why does one woman get breast cancer and not another? Aside from genetics, there are often multiple factors that contribute to the development of breast cancer. And yes, there are things you can do now to be proactive to minimize your risk for developing this disease. Let’s take a look at what you can start doing today to protect your health.

Stressed about stress?

Stress is a part of everyday life, and you’re expected to be able to handle it, whether it’s at work or at home. But how much stress is too much stress? And is there a way to objectively measure your stress levels? Let’s take a closer look to find out.

Don’t reach for those readers yet!

It’s a fact of life. As you age, many people start to notice that their vision isn’t quite what it used to be. Things start getting fuzzier and routine tasks like reading a menu or a newspaper become a challenge. When this happens, your first thought probably would be to get your eyes checked and either get glasses for the first time or get stronger ones if you already have them. You also may decide join the millions who have had corrective eye surgery to get their 20/20 back.

Taking supplements to lose weight or bulk up? Minimize the risks to your liver!

Nearly half of all U.S. adults take dietary or herbal supplements ranging from multivitamins to fish oil and from calcium to iron. When used correctly to address a vitamin or mineral imbalance or deficiency, these supplements can do wonders to help you be your healthiest. Studies are showing, however, that people are increasingly taking the wrong supplements or are using them incorrectly which may cause an increase in liver damage. And research shows that supplements that promote weight loss or bodybuilding are among the most common not being used correctly.

Would you like water with that?

Some people like drinking water while they eat, while others only drink it before or after but never with a meal. Personal preferences aside, the Internet is rife with recommendations and theories as to which best helps digestion, which hurts it and whether when you drink water even really matters.

Are cell phones harming your children?

For most people, cell phones are an integral part of daily life. And there’s an app for everything, from business productivity to video chatting and from laundry services to ride sharing. It’s easy to stay connected all the time and it seems that’s exactly what people are doing. As of April 2014, there were over 328 million cell phones in use in the U.S. (yes, more than one cell phone for every man, woman and child), and that number is expected to continue to increase. It seems everyone in the family but the dog has a phone or even two.

Are asthma inhalers stunting your child’s growth?

Asthma inhalers are a fixture in many children’s backpacks and the school nurse’s office. Often, a quick burst of albuterol means the difference between gasping through or acing the one-mile running test. Allergists and pediatricians rely on these colorful devices for their reliable treatment of asthma and reactive airway disease, which is reaching epidemic proportions among kids. As with any medication, though, it’s important to know and manage the risks of asthma medication.

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