Sharing Urology Wisdom for Overall Health

Proactive Health

This idea of sharing is important. There’s so little transparency in medicine, mostly due to the stranglehold the insurance companies have on the industry. Thankfully patients are more savvy today — which I love. They’re more well read, and willing to challenge their physicians. I developed my urology telemedicine platform, VirtuCare, partly with this in mind. Circumventing the insurance companies to provide patients with the wisdom and compassion that empowers them to make better healthcare decisions.

By Joe Pazona, 3 weeks ago

One of the greatest gifts urologists have is nothing to do with our surgical skills; it’s the wisdom we can share. This goes back to why I became a urologist in the first place. In my third year of medical school, going through the surgery rotation, I was invited to observe a kidney stone removal — I know, we’d all watch the Netflix special on that! But the urologist, a guy in his 60s, was like a kid in a candy shop when that stone came out. Then he and the resident just spent the time hitting me with questions in the socratic fashion. The more I spoke to urologists, the more I discovered that these were intelligent, approachable people that loved to share their wisdom. I wanted to be a part of that. 


This idea of sharing is important. There’s so little transparency in medicine, mostly due to the stranglehold the insurance companies have on the industry. Thankfully patients are more savvy today — which I love. They’re more well read, and willing to challenge their physicians. I developed my urology telemedicine platform, VirtuCare, partly with this in mind. Circumventing the insurance companies to provide patients with the wisdom and compassion that empowers them to make better healthcare decisions.  


So what wisdom do I share the most? Drink more water — I’m the plumber, right? You can’t underestimate what water does for you. 


From a urological perspective, dehydration is the leading cause of kidney stones; that’s not a fun thing to experience, and 10% of the U.S. population are going to get them at some point. Not to mention that urinary tract infections can be caused by buildup of bacteria in the bladder due to infrequent urination — because you’re not drinking enough! It can even help stave off bladder cancer; the more water you drink, the more you flush out toxins from smoking, chemical intake, and genetic issues, which limits the bladder’s exposure to them. 

But water is a powerful tool for overall health, too. People forget that 60% of our body is water. Our brain and heart is up over 70%, and our muscles over 80%. Is it any surprise that patients who are dehydrated are irritable, don’t sleep well, and have trouble exercising? Water is an essential nutrient. Water is also one of the most powerful tools for weight loss. When you’re well-hydrated, you make better decisions with your food, and your stomach is fuller. There’s only so much room in your stomach, so if you fill it with a 20oz glass of water before you pick up the hamburger and the fries, you’re probably not going to eat as much. Water is not just beneficial from a urological perspective, but also a powerful tool for overall health.


So, drink more water. Make some time to talk to a urologist, too — we want to share what we know so that you can be proactive about improving your quality of life!   

Joe Pazona

Joe is a Urologist at VirtuCare, a telemedicine platform that specializes in urology.

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