New Research Suggests that Diabetes is More Deadly than Commonly Thought

The fourth Tuesday in March is Diabetes Alert Day! It is a one day wake-up call to inform the public about the seriousness of diabetes. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), approximately 29 million Americans are affected by diabetes. “About 1 in every 4 persons with diabetes, or 8 million Americans, are unaware that they have the disease,” NIH reports.

Mary Tyler Moore and UK Prime Minister prove type 1 diabetes doesn’t have to limit what you can do

Though you might not have realized, type 1 diabetes has been in the news lately! TV icon Mary Tyler Moore recently died from complications related to type 1 diabetes (among other conditions). She was diagnosed with the condition at age 33, just before the Mary Tyler Moore Show made its debut. She worked tirelessly as a diabetes advocate, serving as international chair of JDRF (formerly called the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). She testified before Congress and led campaigns that raised billions for type 1 diabetes research.

Diabetics can benefit from daily walks, but when should you walk and for how long?

If you have Type 2 diabetes, you may have heard that you could benefit from daily walks. But did you know that when you walk can make a difference? In a new study published in Diabetologia, scientists compared two sets of advice adults with Type 2 diabetes are often given: going for a 30-minute walk each day, or walking for 10 minutes after each main meal. What they found?

Try this to reverse prediabetes and avoid getting diabetes

You’ve been putting on some weight lately. It’s nothing crazy; it’s just a little bit each year. You know that it probably has something to do with your diet, or maybe that soda habit. Besides dusting off the old basement treadmill in January, you aren’t big on “working out,” though you know you probably should. You are out of breath much quicker these days so you make a mental note to self to try to walk more. Otherwise, you feel reasonably healthy, maybe a little high blood pressure or cholesterol.

How to lower blood sugar using just apple cider vinegar

Vinegar comes from the French word vin aigre meaning sour wine. It can be made from almost any fermented carbohydrate - wine, molasses, dates, pears, berries and apples have all been used to make vinegar, with apple cider vinegar being one of the most popular kinds. The benefits to apple cider vinegar are abundant.

Prediabetic? Try exercise to control your blood sugar levels

Staying fit into middle age may be one way to reduce your risk of prediabetes and diabetes, according to a new study published in Diabetologia online. Prediabetes simply means your blood sugar is higher than normal, but is not yet diabetes. It is estimated that half of all U.S. adults have either prediabetes or diabetes.

How diabetes and foot drop are related

If you have diabetes, or someone you love has diabetes, you are certainly not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, 29.1 million Americans had diabetes in 2012. That’s 9.3 percent of the population. Among senior citizens, age 65 and up, the prevalence was even higher, at 25.9 percent. As you may already know, diabetes can cause problems with your feet, including “foot drop.” Foot drop refers to the inability to lift the front part of the foot. People who have this condition may be noted to lift their knees higher than normal to avoid dragging their toes.

Two birds, one stone: Fight obesity and diabetes together

Type 2 diabetes has been on the rise in the U.S. Of the people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, about 80 to 90 percent are also diagnosed as obese. This provides an interesting clue to the link between diabetes and obesity. So, how exactly can obesity cause Type 2 diabetes? Read on to find out.

Diabetes and Water Retention: How Are They Related?

If you have diabetes, or if someone close to you does, perhaps you've noticed some swelling in the ankles where fluid has built up, causing a puffy appearance. This is typically water retention, also called edema, and is relatively common among diabetics. Let’s take a look at how diabetes and water retention are related.

Chromium: A promising mineral for diabetes treatment

Chromium is a mineral that your body requires in small amounts. It can be found in certain foods as well as IN many supplements. Studies suggest that it is involved in normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. But that’s not all. There is a growing interest in the possible beneficial role of chromium in the treatment of diabetes.

Diabetes and low magnesium go hand in hand

Diabetes and low magnesium levels: Two common health problems affecting millions of people. But did you know that they are related? Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, according to the CDC. And most people, in general, aren’t getting enough magnesium on a daily basis. It turns out, low magnesium may make you worse off for developing diabetes, and having diabetes may in turn deplete your existing magnesium levels. Magnesium depletion affects at least 30 percent of diabetics. It’s a cycle that needs to be broken, and it starts with education. Let’s take a look at the relationship between this mineral and diabetes.

What is metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome, also called syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome or dysmetabolic syndrome, is a “cluster of conditions” that increase your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes (Mayo Clinic). Having just one of the conditions does not mean you have metabolic syndrome; typically, it is defined as having three or more of the five common traits: large waist circumference, high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, low HDL (“good”) cholesterol and elevated fasting blood sugar.

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